On 26 October 1998, Ecuador and Peru signed a comprehensive peace agreement that ended a border conflict. The formal delimitation of the border regions began on 13 May 1999. The agreement was ratified without resistance by the congresses of the two nations and eventually ended the dispute, nearly two centuries after the South American nations (or their predecessors) claimed independence from the Spanish crown. “This agreement marks the end of protests and actions throughout Ecuador,” Arnaud said, announcing in radio comments that an agreement had been reached. “We have proved that everything is possible in peace and that nothing good will be achieved without it,” said Jose Ayala Lasso, the Ecuadorian, in the same room of the Brazilian Ministry of Foreign Affairs where the two nations participated on the 26th The Comprehensive and Final Peace Agreement was signed on October 12, 1998. The peace agreement was followed by the formal delimitation of the borders on 13 May 1999 and the end of the multinational operation MOMEP (Military Observer Mission for Ecuador and Peru) on 17 June 1999 [2] “A solution for peace and for the country: the government will replace Decree 883 with a new mechanism that has mechanisms to address its resources to the populations, who need it most,” Moreno said on Twitter after the meeting in the city of Cumbaya. Conaie said he was also celebrating the “victory” and highlighted the removal of fuel subsidy cuts. But he warned on Twitter that “it`s not over until the deal is fully realized.” The dispute lasted until the late nineteenth century and early twentieth century. Many attempts have been made to define the borders, but the two governments have not reached an acceptable agreement for their electoral districts. A war between Colombia and Peru took place in 1932 and 1933 in the eastern region of the Amazon and led to the official designation of the Putumayo River as the border between Colombia and Peru; But part of society saw this as detrimental to the Ecuadorian cause, with Colombia now recognizing Peru`s rights to the territory that Ecuador claimed as its own. An agreement to recognize the territories de facto held by each country was signed in 1936, but smaller military skirmishes began in 1938.

Tensions escalated and war broke out in July 1941 and officially ended with the signing of the Rio de Janeiro Protocol on January 29, 1942. The treaty was supposed to put a definitive end to the long-standing territorial dispute, but in 1960, then-Ecuadorian President José Mª Velasco Ibarra proposed to Congress a thesis of nullity based on the fact that the 1942 protocol was imposed under duress on the Ecuadorian government. . . .