In grammar, the agreement refers to the fact or state of elements of a sentence or clause that are identical in sex, number or in person – that is, in a consistent manner. For example, in “We are late” the subject and the verb agree in number and in person (there is no agreement in “We are late”); in “Students are responsible for handing over their homework,” the precursor (“students”) of pronodem (“theirs”) agrees. The precursor of a pronoun is the name or other pronoun to which the pronoun refers. One of the synonyms of this agreement is La Concorde. “Verbal.” Merriam-Webster.com thesaurus, Merriam-Webster, www.merriam-webster.com/thesaurus/verbal. Access 2 Dec 2020. As a deal (“I agree on the assessment”), correspondence means consent. The verb comes from the Latin competition, which means “to gather in haste, to collide, to exist at the same time, to be in agreement,” and the name – concordance – derives from the Latin parallel, “to come together, to occur at the same time.” The use of conformity corresponds to that of the Latin ancestor. In addition, the agreement has the broader meaning of “agreement of action or opinion.” The nomadic agreement means “agreement” or “compliance.” It often occurs in legal, commercial or political contexts where it is synonymous with contract and similar terms for a formal agreement. In the center of the English agree agreen was formed and had different meanings of “please, satisfied, approval, concord”. It was borrowed by the Anglo-French agreement. This word is composed of a-, a prefix that goes back in Latin ad, and -greer, a verbal derivative of Gré, which means “gratitude, satisfaction, pleasure, pleasure, consent.” The French base comes from the Latin gretum, the Kastat of the Grétus, which means “grateful, welcomed with gratitude, welcome, pleasant.” Semantically, the etymology of the expert is very pleasant.

In the law, the word is used as a synonym for consent, as in “The Secretary of the Ministry of Finance has received written approval from the Attorney General.” Here is a presidential example: another familiar use of conventions is in law and politics, where it is used as a term for an agreement between two or more groups (as a country or political organization) to regulate issues that affect everyone – for example, the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea. There are also the Geneva Conventions, a series of four international conventions (1864, 1906, 1929, 1949), which were signed in Geneva, Switzerland, which defined the humanitarian principles by which signatory states must treat military and civilian nationals of an enemy in times of war. The French word derives from the Latin compromisesum, itself related to the former compromitters (promittere means “promise”). In English, compromit was once used as a synonym for the compromised verb in its outdated sense, “to be linked by mutual agreement” and in the modern sense “to cause disability.” The compromise suggests abandoning something we want to reach a mutual agreement (“The union and the employers have agreed to compromise”). Another meaning is to “expose yourself to suspicion, discredit or nonsense,” as in “The actor`s career has been compromised by his politically incorrect tweets” or “The editor would not compromise his principles.” And as mentioned above, it can mean risking someone or something, endangering or having serious consequences. Confidential information, national security or the immune system could be described as a “compromise.” Concordat is a French word for a formal agreement between two or more parties. It is synonymous with words such as compact and covenant, but in the 17th century it was designated as the official name for an agreement between church and state for the regulation of ecclesiastical affairs. A historic agreement was concluded in 1801 between Napoleon Bonaparte as the first consul and Pope Pius VII.