The World Trade Organization (WTO) Public Procurement Agreement, commonly known as the GPA, establishes a framework for public procurement rights and obligations among WTO members who have signed it. The signatories agreed that suppliers of goods and services in other signatory countries would not be treated less favourably than domestic suppliers when covered by the agreement and that their public procurement laws, rules and procedures would be transparent and fair. The agreement was revised in March 2012 and contracting frameworks were expanded. It came into force on April 6, 2014, after reaching the two-thirds acceptance threshold of the parties on March 7, 2014. There is no expiration date. The full text of the revised GPA and the new annexes that list the public procurement covered by all parties to the GPA are available in amp-113. As a result, the first Tokyo Round Code on Government Procurement was signed in 1979 and came into force in 1981. It was amended in 1987 and the amendment came into force in 1988. The parties to the agreement then negotiated the extension of the scope and scope of the agreement, in parallel with the Uruguay Round. Finally, on 15 April 1994, a new public procurement agreement (GPA 1994) was signed in Marrakech at the same time as the WTO agreement, which came into force on 1 January 1996. Foreign government procurement is worth hundreds of billions of dollars a year and offers significant potential opportunities for Canadian exporters. Public procurement obligations in international trade agreements help ensure that Canadian suppliers of goods and services are treated in an open, transparent and non-discriminatory manner when selling to governments outside Canada. In addition to suppliers, open public procurement benefits governments and taxpayers by increasing competition, expanding the choice of available goods and services and, importantly, reducing costs.

When a undersigned government feels that its rights under this agreement are nullified or compromised by another signatory, it may request the initiation of WTO dispute settlement procedures to resolve the issue. The WTO dispute settlement procedure is described in the exporter`s guide to the WTO dispute settlement agreement. The following WTO members are parties to the 1994 agreement:[3] In order to ensure open, fair and transparent competitive conditions in public procurement, a number of WTO members negotiated the Public Procurement Agreement (GPA).